Historical background to Buchner and Woyzeck

1804 Friedrich Schiller writes his last play, William Tell.
 
1812 Napoleon reaches Moscow but is forced to retreat, losing almost 600,000 men in battle. 
 
1813 Georg Buchner is born in Hessen, Germany. 
 
1814 Prussia invades France after Napoleon’s defeat at Leipzig. Two million lives are lost in the wars. 
 
1815 The German Confederation is established. 
 
1819 August Friedrich von Kotzebue, one of the most popular playwrights of the time, dies. 
 
1825 Buchner enters the Grand-Ducal Gymnasium as a student. 
 
1828 Russia declares war on Turkey. 
 
1830 France invades Algeria. 
 
1831 Buchner enrolls at the University in Strasbourg to study medicine. He falls in love with Minna Jaegle and they become secretly engaged. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe writes the second part of Faust. Belgium gains independence from the Netherlands. 
 
1833 Buchner transfers to the University of Giessen Slavery is abolished in Britain. 
 
1834 Buchner writes the radical political pamphlet “The Hessian Messenger.” He moves back to Strasbourg to escape arrest. 
 
1835 Buchner completes his first play, “Danton’s Death.” He writes his second play, “Leonce and Lena,” for a competition. 
 
1836 Buchner receives his doctorate. He begins working on “Woyzeck.” 
 
1837 February: Buchner contracts typhus and dies the age of twenty-three. 
 
1878 The first version of “Woyzeck” is published by Karl Emil Franzos under the title “Wozzeck.” 
 
1902 The first performance of “Danton’s Death.” 
 
1910 A revised version of “Woyzeck” is produced by Max Reinhardt. 
 
1913 Premiere of “Wozzeck” in Munich. 
 
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