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Verbatim Theatre

Explore the highly complex, challenging and engaging Verbatim Theatre with these links, posts and articles.


Four simple ways to explore Bertolt Brecht’s concept of distancing

Twenty years ago this year, I went to see what was for me, one of the most defining pieces of theatre that I have seen. I’m talking about The Caucasian Chalk Circle by Bertolt Brecht performed by Theatre de Complicite at the Royal National Theatre in London. For me it was an incredibly important performance because it came at a point when I was just beginning to define … Continue reading Four simple ways to explore Bertolt Brecht’s concept of distancing

10 Fundamental Key Terminology for Greek Theatre

Protagonist: The leading character in a story Antagonist: The leading villain of a story Tragedy: A play dealing with tragic events and having an unhappy ending, especially one concerning the downfall of the main character Comedy: A play characterized by its humorous or satirical tone and its depiction of amusing people or incidents, in which the characters ultimately triumph over adversity. In Greek Theatre Comedy … Continue reading 10 Fundamental Key Terminology for Greek Theatre

Theatre In Education Links

“Theatre in Education (TIE) is a process in which it includes all the interactive theatre/drama practices that help aid the educational process. As TIE is used, new strategies and objectives for using theatre as an educational tool emerge.” (Wikipedia) Overview  BBC Bitesize Revision Page – Absolutely awesome place to start researching and learning about TIE.  Wikipedia site on Applied Drama, an umbrella term that modern … Continue reading Theatre In Education Links

Physical Theatre (Genre) Links

“Physical theatre is a genre of theatrical performance that pursues storytelling through primarily physical means. Several performance traditions all describe themselves as “physical theatre”, but the unifying aspect is a reliance on physical motion of the performers rather than or combined with text to convey the story. In basic sense, you talk through hand gestures, body language, thought track and many more physical features.” (Wikipedia) General Information BBC … Continue reading Physical Theatre (Genre) Links

Brecht and Epic Theatre Links

Eugen Bertolt Friedrich Brecht (10 February 1898 – 14 August 1956) was a German poet, playwright, and theatre director of the 20th century. He made contributions to dramaturgy and theatrical production, the latter through the tours undertaken by the Berliner Ensemble – the post-war theatre company operated by Brecht and his wife, long-time collaborator and actress Helene Weigel. (Wikipedia) Overview of Brecht The BBC Bitesize website has 11 pages covering his background, his theories and his works. … Continue reading Brecht and Epic Theatre Links

Verbatim Theatre Links

“Verbatim theatre is a form of documentary theatre in which plays are constructed from the precise words spoken by people interviewed about a particular event or topic.” (Wikipedia) What is Verbatim Theatre? The National Theatre, UK, guide to making Verbatim Theatre. An essay by Theatre Ciritc Micheal Billingham for The Gaurdian about Verbatim Theatre. Another article in The Gaurdian about Verbatim Theatre, this time written … Continue reading Verbatim Theatre Links

10 facts about Melodrama

Fact #1. A Tale of Mystery The first melodrama was a play called A Tale of Mystery by English writer called Thomas Holcroft. His play was a mixture of fact paced action, sentimentality and a happy ending. Fact #2. Industrial Revolution Melodrama grew in the backdrop of the industrial revolution. During this time 77% of the British population moved to live in cities where they … Continue reading 10 facts about Melodrama

How Shakespeare uses language to set the scene.

How did Shakespeare overcome not having any set in his stage? How did Shakespeare’s actors use his words to understand how to act? How does this compare to modern performances of Shakespeare? Setting the scene through language. In the opening prologue of Henry V Shakespeare asks us, his audience, to imagine the theatre as the battle ground of Agincourt and to imagine that “when we … Continue reading How Shakespeare uses language to set the scene.

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